Pickled Quail Eggs

Unless you’re one of those who will actually boil or steam then shell several dozen quail eggs–the type who might berate you for using vanilla extract instead of stripping beans–use good canned eggs and either (as here) slit cayennes or sweet bananas. They’re good for a month, then recycle the jar.

Beth Ann’s Banana Bread

“Oh, she’d make banana bread like anyone else, in a loaf pan, nutmeg, pecan and all that, but what she did special was serve it with sour cream and honey. Now, this was good cold, too, but if she got that loaf just right out of the oven, you’d have it the best. Melt in your mouth.”

Hot Mustard

Many people serve a baked ham for Easter and with it mustard in degrees of heat and sweet. These confections are made in advance, best at least the night before, though always good to have on hand. This recipe is also good with any smoked meat, particularly turkey. Beat well three whole eggs, combine with a cup of Coleman’s dry mustard, a cup of herb vinegar—balsamic or tarragon—and a half cup of light brown sugar. Cook over low heat until thickened, chill and store. This preparation keeps quite well in a tightly sealed container.

Egg Salad: Art, Angst and Espionage

Egg salad simply screams of ladies’ luncheons and soda fountain sandwiches. Pimento and cheese once was similarly associated, but now thanks to the same Southern machismo ethic that has established eating a white bread Vidalia onion sandwich dribbling Duke’s mayo over the kitchen sink virtually a rite of passage, P&C has transcended effete associations and is even found served in micro-breweries (with unassuming yet authoritative amber larger and parsnip chips). Still and all, the South is nothing if not traditional, and while egg salad might certainly be served on pumpernickel at some happy hour buffet in a west Florida leather bar, by far for the most part it perseveres as a staple at occasions with a heavy distaff attendance such as christenings, weddings and those inevitable funerals.

Basic egg salad is just chopped, cooked—usually boiled—eggs blended with a sauce or emulsion to make a spread, but as with most simple recipes, variations abound and additions are discussed, debated and occasionally disputed. For instance, olives seem to be a traditional addition throughout the nation, but most recipes from the South tend to include black olives whereas above the Mason-Dixon Line green olives with pim(i)ento stuffing is the general rule. Woody Allen trivialized egg salad in his 1966 feature film debut as the object of Phil Moskowitz’s search for the stolen recipe of the Grand Exalted High Majah of Raspur, giving heft to my argument that when it comes to egg salad people can work themselves into a steaming froth over seemingly the most insignificant details, which puts this sandwich spread right up there with art, law and religion.

Yes, use boiled eggs; though I’m certain some misguided unbalanced individuals actually do make egg salad with scrambled eggs, or horror of horrors compounded mangled omelets or even worse God help us please not quiche. I mash mine with a wide-tined fork and add good mayonnaise to texture. Adjust the amount to your own tastes; me, I like it a little on the dry/chunky side as opposed to the creamy/smooth. Of course I use black olives, usually canned pitted jumbo, but Kalamata give it a nice salty kick and the olive oil is a nice touch. Finely-chopped celery and green onion give egg salad a better texture, a dash of pepper vinegar or lemon juice gives it a little bite, and I like mine peppery, served on rye toast with a light Pilsner.

Creamed Eggs Chartres

Very soon you’re bound to have a few boiled eggs left over, and here’s a great recipe for a light buffet any time of the day.

Brennan’s of New Orleans: Creamed Eggs Chartres

1 cup finely chopped/shredded white onions
1/3 cup butter
1/4 cup flour
2 cups of milk
1 egg yolk
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
4 hard boiled eggs, peeled and sliced (reserving 4 center slices for garnishment)
2 tablespoons Parmesan cheese
1 tablespoon of paprika

In a large skillet sauté onion in butter until clear/transparent; stir in flour and cook slowly 3-5 minutes more. Blend in milk and egg yolk until smooth. Add salt and pepper. Cook, stirring constantly, 8-10 minutes longer or until sauce thickens. Remove from heat, add sliced eggs and mix lightly. Spoon into 2 8-oz casseroles and sprinkle with paprika and Parmesan cheese mixed together. Bake at 350 degrees until bubbling. Garnish with eggs slices; serves two. This is a wonderful breakfast or brunch recipe, and can be served in a casserole with toasted French bread slices.

Cornmeal Wafers

You’ll find milled maize cooked all over the world now, in its simplest and still most popular form as one a hundred basic breads, most being nothing more than maize of some ilk, water and maybe grease, tricky recipes since they have to be handled properly. This recipe is typical, as simple as it is fussy, but rewarding. Preheat oven to 400, and generously oil a baking pan. Mix salt, a scant teaspoon to a cup of meal, two tablespoons oil or melted butter, which I prefer,  mix cup for cup with hot water into a thick batter manageable with a spoon; think pancakes.  Herbs and spices are appealing options, but I prefer to keep additions at a minimum. There’s not a lot of batter involved , like a tablespoon for each 3 in. wafer, but they take a while, so get on social media and vent for twenty minutes before taking a peek, and if the cakes are ever-so-lightly browned on the outsides—these are some of the prettiest little breads you’ll ever make—return them to the oven and cut it off, then I can go back and rail at the world again. These should be served hot, directly from the oven, but reheat beautifully.